International Institute for Culture

 
 


"The Mother of the Redeemer has a precise place in the plan of salvation, for "when the time had fully come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons. And because you are sons, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, `Abba! Father!'" (Gal. 4:4-6) ....This "fullness" indicates the moment fixed from all eternity when
the Father sent his Son "that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life" (Jn. 3:16). It denotes the blessed moment when the Word that "was with God...became flesh and dwelt among us" (Jn. 1:1, 14), and made himself our brother. It marks the moment when the Holy Spirit, who had already infused the fullness of grace into Mary of Nazareth, formed in her virginal womb the human nature of Christ. This "fullness" marks the moment when, with the entrance of the eternal into time, time itself is redeemed, and being filled with the mystery of Christ becomes definitively "salvation time." Finally, this "fullness" designates the hidden beginning of the Church's journey. In the liturgy the Church salutes Mary of Nazareth as the Church's own beginning,[3] for in the event of the Immaculate Conception the Church sees projected, and anticipated in her most noble member, the saving grace of Easter. And above all, in the Incarnation she encounters Christ and Mary indissolubly joined: he who is the Church's Lord and Head and she who, uttering the first fiat of the New Covenant, prefigures the Church's condition as spouse and mother. "
 
      - John Paul II's Redemptoris Mater
 
This Advent Series will address the role of Our Lady in salvation history, the life of the Church, and Western culture.
 
Schedule: 11:00 a.m. Mass at Our Lady of Lourdes Church
12:00 noon. Brunch at Ivy Hall
1:00 p.m. Lecture

"The Magnificat: Echoes of the Virgin's Canticle of Joy"

Speaker: Mr. Timothy McDonnell (PhD candidate), Director of Schola Ceciliana
Time: December 1
11:00 a.m. Mass at Our Lady of Lourdes Church
12:00 noon. Brunch at Ivy Hall
1:00 p.m. Lecture
 
Mr. Timothy McDonnell worked on his DMA in Orchestral Conducting at the Univeraity of South Carolina and his MM in Choral Conducting at Yale University. He has conducted at the USC, along with performances in Italy and China. He is presently an Instructor in Music Theory and Ear Training at USC and a Harpsichordist for the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia.
 
A survey of musical masterpieces inspired by Mary's timeless act of faith. Although it is less popular today than in the past, the Magnificat figured prominently in the spiritual and cultural development of the Church. A scant ten verses, this brief text is Our Lady's longest address in scripture; nevertheless, the Church Fathers esteemed it vital enough to the Christian faith that they made it the centerpiece of the Vespers liturgy.
 
Cost: $20/person, $35/couple for Brunch & Lecture; $10/person for Lecture alone

"Reflections on Marian Apparitions"

Speaker: Fr. Benedict Groeschel
Time: December 8
11:00 a.m. Mass at Our Lady of Lourdes Church
12:00 noon. Brunch at Ivy Hall
1:00 p.m. Lecture
 
Fr. Benedict J. Groeschel, C.F.R., is the Director of the Office for Spiritual Development of the Archdiocese of New York. He founded and is on the staff of Trinity Retreat, a center for prayer and study for the clergy. John Cardinal O'Connor appointed him promoter of the cause of Canonization of the Servant of God Terence Cardinal Cooke in 1984. Previously Father Benedict was chaplain of the Children's Village in Dobbs Ferry, New York, for fourteen years. Father Benedict obtained his doctorate in psychology at St. Joseph's Seminary of the Archdiocese of New York. He has taught at Fordham University, Iona College, and Maryknoll Seminary. He is also chairman of the Good Counsel Homes and the St. Francis House, which provides residence and programs for the homeless young mothers and homeless youth. In May 1987, along with eight other friars, Fr. Benedict formed the community of Franciscan Friars of the Renewal under the patronage of Cardinal O'Connor. This community, which follows the Capuchin Tradition, is dedicated to preaching reform and providing care for the homeless in South Bronx.
 
A popular speaker on EWTN, Fr. Benedict is also a prolific writer on themes related to spirituality and psychology, his books include The Cross at Ground Zero, Arise from Darkness: What to Do When Life Does not Make Sense, In the Presence of the Lord: The History, Theology, and Psychology of Eucharistic Adoration, and A Still Small Voice: A Practical Guide to Reported Revelations.
 
Cost: $20/person, $35/couple for Brunch & Lecture; $10/person for Lecture alone

"The Annunciation in European Art"

Speaker: Mrs. Nora Hamerman, Adjunct Prof. of Art at Notre Dame Graduate School of Christendom College
Time: December 15
11:00 a.m. Mass at Our Lady of Lourdes Church
12:00 noon. Brunch at Ivy Hall
1:00 p.m. Lecture
 
Nora Hamerman, currently an adjunct professor at the Notre Dame Graduate School of Christendom College, where she teaches a course in Sacred Art and Theology, is a Ph.D. Candidate at New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. She received her BA with highest honors from Michigan State University and her MA from New York University. She was a Fulbright Scholar in Rome, a fellow of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and a Chester Dale fellow of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC She has taught at the University of Virginia and Shenandoah University. She and her husband Warren converted to the Catholic faith in 1990 and have been active in the Diocese of Arlington, Virginia in writing and lecturing about sacred art. In addition to articles for scholarly journals such as Art Quarterly and Arte Illustrata, Mrs. Hamerman has frequently written for the Arlington Catholic Herald. Her slide lecture illustrating Dante's Divine Comedy, first presented in Philadelphia in 1980, has been seen in cities around the United States, Canada, western Europe, and Latin America.
 
Annunciation in Art: The most beloved subject of Renaissance painting and sculpture, treated by almost every celebrated artist, was the Annunciation to Mary of the Incarnation of Christ. In Italy, March 25 was New Year's Day. Mary was called the "first scientist" because her assent to the angelic salutation was the beginning of the collaboration between God and Man upon which all real science is based. The presentation will begin with Giotto's Arena Chapel in Padua, and a description of the festival during Advent at which the Annunciation was reenacted, and continue through the era of the Catholic Reform. Besides the art in Italy celebrating the Annunciation, the talk will include the great Northern European examples, such as those by Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, and Veit Stoss.
 
Cost: $20/person, $35/couple for Brunch & Lecture; $10/person for Lecture alone

"Mary: Our Lady of the Eucharist"

Speaker: Father Shaun Mahoney, Assistant Professor of Systematic Theology at St. Charles Seminary
Time: December 22
11:00 a.m. Mass at Our Lady of Lourdes Church
12:00 noon. Brunch at Ivy Hall
1:00 p.m. Lecture
 
The Reverend Shaun Mahoney is an assistant professor in the Department of Systematic Theology in the Theology Division of St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, Philadelphia. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard University, his Master of Divinity degree from St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, his license and his doctorate in Sacred Theology from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. He was ordained to the priesthood for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in 1991 and served as a Parochial Vicar at Saint Bernadette Parish in Drexel Hill, PA before pursuing graduate studies at the Pontifical Gregorian in Rome. He has been teaching at the Seminary in Philadelphia for the past three years.
 
Description: Just as the Blessed Mother allows the Incarnate Word to be born in her in time, we too must allow the Incarnate Word to be born in us in time. This is realized supremely in our receiving the living Eucharist, the Word in our midst. It is helpful, however, to acknowledge that all discipleship finds foundational form in Mary. Therefore, in order to live an attitude of Advent, not only for this upcoming Christmas but in a continuing way towards the Eucharist, we explore the Eucharistic form of Our Lady.
 
Cost: $20/person, $35/couple for Brunch & Lecture; $10/person for Lecture alone

 

Latin Lives at Ivy Hall
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The IIC offers Latin classes throughout the year in the evening on Wednesdays, as well as full-time summer intensive courses. For more information, click here to contact the Institute.



Sunday, November 19
Monthly Meeting of the Southeast PA Chesterton Society: Belloc's "The Four Men: A Farrago"

 
Thursday, November 30
Love and War in the Iliad

 
Sunday, December 3
Gregorian Chant and the Spirit of Liturgical Prayer

 



 
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